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Query from: pc, United States, 01/04/07
Topic: BEAUTY      Submitted on: Ammas.com
Subject: need more info on arappu( tamil) used to wash hair

Hi Ammas, I need help from tamil ppl, a green color powder which is used to wash hair just like shikakai, it is called arappu, i would like to know what is the english name for it and why it is used and what are the benefits. is the powder made from seeds or leaves? any idea? i know it is common in coimbatore,erode region of tamilnadu. thanks

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Response from: NEERAJA NAVEEN,   
Registered Member on Ask Agent
the smell of "arappu" is good . It is powdered leaves of a tree in our area. We use it to wash our hair.we always wondered about arappupodi. we used to get them in the stores in packages. it was a substitute for seekai podi.in chennai atleast, arappu was used more for cleaning patharams.

arappu is Albizia amara in english.

Botanic description:

Albizia amara is a small to moderate-sized, much-branched deciduous tree with smooth, dark green, scaly bark. It resembles the acacias but lacks thorns. Its root system is shallow and spreading. The leaves are pinnately compound, with 15-24 pairs of small, linear leaflets, on 6-15 pairs of pinnae. The yellow, fragrant and globose flowers are in clusters. They develop when the tree is almost leafless. Flowers pedicelled, yellow, fragrant, in 12-20 globose heads. Fruits are oblong pods, about 10-28 x 2-5 cm, light brown, puberulous, thin, and 6-8 seeded; seeds flattened, 8-13 x 7-8 mm. The genus was named after Filippo del Albizzi, a Florentine nobleman who in 1749 introduced A. julibrissin into cultivation. The specific name amara is probably the Latin word meaning ‘bitter’, although the allusion is not clear.

Natural Habitat:

amara is a strong light-demander, is intolerant of shade, very hardy and shows marked resistance to drought. It has a wide distribution in Africa, occurring from Sudan and Ethiopia southwards to Zimbabwe, Botswana and the Transvaal, growing mainly in sandy woodlands. In India, it is one of the characteristic trees of the dry regions of Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka. The scrub forests in which it is usually found often have thorny species, particularly acacias. The most common associates met are xerophytic species such as Annogeissus latifolia, Boswellia serrata, Chloroxylon swietenia, Dalbergia paniculata and Ziziphus mauritiana.

Functional uses:

Products:

Food: Leaves are used as an adulterant for tea. Fodder: The leaves make excellent fodder. Fuel: The branches are suited to both firewood and charcoal. Timber: The wood from this species is darkish in colour, fine grained and hard. It can therefore be used for furniture making, agricultural implements and construction. Tannin or dyestuff: Tannins may be obtained from the bark. Poison: It is alleged that the seeds are poisonous. Medicine: The tree yields a gum used against ulcers; fruits are said to cure malaria and coughs. Other products: It is reported that soap can be made from the roots and leaves can be used for washing hair.

Services:

Erosion control: Its spreading root system makes it a good soil binder, deterring soil erosion. Shade or shelter: Albizias are popular as shade trees for tea and coffee plantations. Reclamation: This is a very good species for afforestation of degraded hilly areas in dry and semi-arid tracts in mixture with other species such as Acacia catechu, A. planifrons, Anogeissus latifolia and Azadirachta indica. Ornamental: A. amara can be planted in urban areas as an ornamental and avenue tree. Intercropping: In India, Indonesia and other countries, it is usually incorporated into smallholding, rainfed agriculture and diversified with corn, cassava and fruit trees such as papaya, mango and orange.

Pests and diseases: No insects pests of importance have been reported so far; the larvae of Achaea janata defoliate, Bruchus uberatus damage seeds and pods, and the larvae of Bruchus schroderi var. importatus also attack the seeds.

source : http://www.worldagroforestrycentre.…

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Response from: sri sri,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Hi,

An ancient Pandya king of South India was so enraptured by his wife's tresses, that he posed a singularly significant question at court the next day- "Is the fragrance that emanates from a woman's tresses natural or due to her perfumed cosmetics?" The story goes that none of his court poets could answer his question satisfactorily and in a fit of pique, he had them hanged. Lord Shiva, the God of Destruction came down, disguised as a poet, and sent a beautiful couplet that laid the king's doubts to rest. It really may be true; the tresses of the Indian female may really be blessed with a natural fragrance. I say this with authority because over the centuries, women have looked towards Mother Nature to provide them the best hair care products.

Soapnut or Shikakai, as it is called in South India is the chief item in this beauty regimen. It is a brownish looking pod which is dried in the sun for at least a couple of weeks and then made into a fine powder. Its lather is known to rival even the best of shampoos worldwide.

The second ingredient is Arappu, which is another variation of Shikakai. It is more slippery to the touch and takes that much longer to wash off.

A very popular product that is still being used prevalently today is the shoeflower or the Hibiscus. Its leaves, flowers and stems are all used to clean and condition the hair. The roots of the shrub are believed to contain deposits of gold and hence its association with the shine of health and beauty.

But, the most popular of them all is the humble Henna It is also known as Mehendi in North India and Marudani in the Southern languages. Usually, henna (or '&heena'8 as it is called in the North Western provinces and Pakistan) is used to adorn the hands. The juice of its leaves leave reddish stains on the skin which before they are dry, are stylized into intricate designs and patterns.

But as a hair care product, henna is unequalled as a conditioner and a natural astringent. Black henna dyes the gray hairs and ordinary henna imparts beautiful red highlights to the hair

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Response from: S S,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Hi,

arappu is Albizia amara. It is appearing in dry parts of Tamil nadu.The powder from the leaves is used to wash hair. It removes oil.The leaves and pods of Albizia amara serve a natural conditioner for the hair while taking a bath.

read more at.http://www.worldagroforestrycentre.…

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Response from: Saira Jabeen,   
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Arappu is a common road side tree names Sirsa(Albizia Amara). The green powder you mentioned here would be the dry leaves of this tree. In certain regions its flowers are also used for in various home made remedies for facial problems. For more details read whole article at following website http://www.botanical.com/site/colum…

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Response from: Nisha Danny,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Hello, It would be herbal powder as neem, neem, gulab, tulsi, aloe vera, karela, sarpagandha and ashwagandha or henna. You can contact for more information: No. 59, New No. 21, A/29, NBC Nagar, G.N. Mills Post, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu - 641 029, India Phone: +(91)-(422)-5502025/4372724 Website: http://www.indiamart.com/sanjayexpo…

Best wishes.

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Response from: Hari Rama,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Hi, Clearing nut powder, Mimosa amara, Arappu powder & Acacia concinna powder.Arappu is a herbal powder and use to wash hair in native place.I do not know the ebglish name for it.

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Response from: Keep Smiling .,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Arappu, is another variation of Shikakai. It is more slippery to the touch and takes that much longer to wash off

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Response from: Seetha Hariharan,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Hi, Arappu podi used for washing hair.The second ingredient is Arappu(thool), which is another variation of Shikakai. It is more sticky to the touch and takes that much longer to wash off.

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Response from: ,   
Council Member on Ask Agent
arappu (Albizia amara)

http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/2000/…

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Response from: ambreen AZHAR,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
arappu is another variation of shikakai,,it is slippery in nature

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Response from: nagarajan ramanathan,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
it is made up of dal. it is a natural one. no side effects etc

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